Just Look At You

ONLY REBLOGS AND REBLOGS ONLY

twitter.com/robbtodd:

    humansofnewyork:

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible.""What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?""Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."
(Dharamshala, India)

    humansofnewyork:

    "I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible."
    "What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?"
    "Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness."

    (Dharamshala, India)

    — 2 days ago with 8068 notes
    humansofnewyork:

"Before I went to the protest that day, I stood in front of a picture of the Dalai Lama, and I swore an oath: ‘If I am arrested, I will not give the names of any of my friends.’ They put me through eight months of interrogation. They burned cigarettes on my face. They made me stand in ice for four hours, until my skin froze into the ice, and then they pushed me forward. They gave me electric shocks on my tongue. They told me they were going to kill my father and mother. After eight months, I had a trial. Two guards stood next to me when I testified, and they hid electric shocks in my sleeves in case I said something they didn’t like. I was sentenced to four years. Sometimes I’d get so hungry I’d eat toothpaste. And sometimes I’d get so thirsty, I’d drink my urine. When I finally got out, I weighed 39 kilograms."
(Dharamshala, India)

    humansofnewyork:

    "Before I went to the protest that day, I stood in front of a picture of the Dalai Lama, and I swore an oath: ‘If I am arrested, I will not give the names of any of my friends.’ They put me through eight months of interrogation. They burned cigarettes on my face. They made me stand in ice for four hours, until my skin froze into the ice, and then they pushed me forward. They gave me electric shocks on my tongue. They told me they were going to kill my father and mother. After eight months, I had a trial. Two guards stood next to me when I testified, and they hid electric shocks in my sleeves in case I said something they didn’t like. I was sentenced to four years. Sometimes I’d get so hungry I’d eat toothpaste. And sometimes I’d get so thirsty, I’d drink my urine. When I finally got out, I weighed 39 kilograms."

    (Dharamshala, India)

    — 2 days ago with 5149 notes

    npr:

    People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their major league baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

    And the oriole is not alone. A seven-year study published Tuesday by the National Audubon Society warns that the migratory routes and habitats of more than half of the birds in North America are now or soon will be threatened by climate change.

    More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

    Photo credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
    GIF credit: National Audubon Society

    — 1 week ago with 402 notes
    theparisreview:

A previously unpublished chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—once “deemed too wild, subversive and insufficiently moral for the tender minds of British children”—is now available for your delectation. It features a jaunt into Wonka’s Vanilla Fudge Room, where many wonders and precariously situated heavy machinery await. (Not an OSHA-compliant workplace, that chocolate factory.)
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.
Illustration: Quentin Blake.

    theparisreview:

    A previously unpublished chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory—once “deemed too wild, subversive and insufficiently moral for the tender minds of British children”—is now available for your delectation. It features a jaunt into Wonka’s Vanilla Fudge Room, where many wonders and precariously situated heavy machinery await. (Not an OSHA-compliant workplace, that chocolate factory.)

    For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

    Illustration: Quentin Blake.

    — 2 weeks ago with 1075 notes
    "There is something in us, as storytellers and as listeners to stories, that demands the redemptive act, that demands that what falls at least be offered the chance to be restored. The reader of today looks for this motion, and rightly so, but what he has forgotten is the cost of it. His sense of evil is diluted or lacking altogether, and so he has forgotten the price of restoration. When he reads a novel, he wants either his sense tormented or his spirits raised. He wants to be transported, instantly, either to mock damnation or a mock innocence."
    Flannery O’Connor; Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose (via wordpainting)
    — 2 months ago with 69 notes
    inritus:

Couple playing footsies on a subway, from Life and Love on the New York City Subway, 1946. Photographed by Stanley Kubrick.

    inritus:

    Couple playing footsies on a subway, from Life and Love on the New York City Subway, 1946. Photographed by Stanley Kubrick.

    (via oneintwenty-four)

    — 2 months ago with 17674 notes
    "I’m just simply baffled by the idea that people can be without shelter in a country, and then be treated as criminals for being without shelter"

    Sir Nigel Rodley, human rights lawyer and UN committee chairman

    33 U.S. cities ban or are considering banning giving food to the homeless

    (via policymic)

    So.. do they want the homeless to starve to death? Or resort to theft?

    Is this a method of slow self-eradication or accelerated imprisonment? I don’t understand why this is being legislated.

    (via anukii)

    (Source: micdotcom, via alexanderchee)

    — 3 months ago with 14896 notes
    Dave Hickey →

    ravimangla:

    I am interested in works in which something happens when you look at them. And also I am interested in works that have either the simplicity or the complexity to change their meanings. Good art, to survive, must change its meaning. If we still had to think about a Pollock the way he thought about…

    — 6 months ago with 2 notes
    "We are very cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are. And we cannot possibly become what we would like to be until we are willing to ask ourselves just why the lives we lead on this continent are mainly so empty, so tame, and so ugly."
    James Baldwin (via moscow)

    (Source: larmoyante, via tamagotchiworldforce)

    — 7 months ago with 5012 notes